École Secondaire Beaumont Composite High School

English

English

The purpose of the high school English program is to assist you in acquiring the skills, attitudes, and knowledge needed to meet the everyday requirements of life. You’ll communicate confidently and competently, and deepen your understanding and appreciation of literature.  English Language Arts courses are required in Grades 10, 11 and 12 and every student must complete English 30-1 or 30-2 to graduate.
There are two aims of the high school English Language Arts (ELA) program: to provide you with an understanding and appreciation of a broad range of texts, and to enable you to use language effectively for a multitude of purposes and in a variety of situations. ELA focuses on six areas of language arts: listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing and representing.


There are the main course sequences in English:

In each course sequence, you can expect to have thought-provoking discussions about a range of genres (including novels, films, short stories, poetry, plays, non-fi ction and much more). Both sequences allow you to engage with the English language in meaningful ways and will open many doors down the road. It is important to talk to your counselors to make sure that your chosen course sequence is opening the doors you need it to.

English 10-1, 20-1 and 30-1 revolve around how you engage with texts and how you express yourself after you have. Students who take this course sequence will spend much of their time studying, creating and analyzing a variety of complex literary texts.


English 10-2, 20-2 and 30-2
allow you to improve your grammar and sentence-building skills through a variety of assignments in functional, creative and analytical writing. Similar to the -1 course sequence, students will engage with a wide range of texts but there will be less emphasis on literary analysis. Both course sequences meet diploma requirements and require that you write a diploma exam upon completion of the 30 level course. Not all post secondary institutions accept English 30-2 for entry, so make sure you’re familiar with entrance requirements for the institutions and programs you’re considering.

Advanced Placement

What is Advanced Placement?

Advanced Placement (AP) is a program run by the College Board, which offers students enrichment of University-level courses in high school. The College Board is the same organization that creates the SATs.

Why take Advanced Placement?

AP has three main benefits.

  1. The first is that students get to work in a challenging environment. The course progresses at a pace suitable for curious, independent and motivated students.
  2. The second is post-secondary credit – students may receive university credit in high school if successful on their final exam. (current transfer information can be found here:
    http://alis.alberta.ca/ec/ep/aas/ta/ibap.html)
  3. The third is financial. The College Board offers a number of scholarships for students who receive advanced standing. Also, there is savings from tuition. For example, students may receive credit for English 100 in high school. Therefore, the expensive university tuition is not required. Plus, your first year course-load may be lighter.

Note: The courses are independent of one another, thus a student can take only 10-1 Pre AP, 20-1AP or 30-1AP if they wish. Teacher recommendation will be required for all courses.

English 10-1 Pre-Advanced Placement

Prerequisite: Minimum 75% in English Language Arts 9 and teacher recommendation
Additional fee: Approximately $50 for course materials

English 10-1 Pre-Advanced Placement introduces students to literary analysis through a cross section of literature from various eras.  Students will develop the ability to read critically and analytically, ask questions about what has been read, recognize assumptions and implications, evaluate ideas, and determine the relationships between form, content, and meaning.  Students will begin with analysis of complete literary works and move to rhetorical analysis, examining author purpose and intent.  This is an Advanced Placement entrance course and is designed to prepare students for AP at the 20 and 30 levels; it will be more rigorous than the English 10-1 program.  Additional reading, writing and creation are to be expected.  Course materials must be read prior to the start of the course for students to be successful.

 English 20-1 Advanced Placement: Language and Composition 

Prerequisite: English 10-1 Pre-AP or 10-1 (75%+) and teacher recommendation
Additional fee: Approximately $50 for course materials
Optional fee: $120 for Advanced Placement Exam

English 20-1 Advanced Placement will integrate the Alberta Learning Program of Studies with the Advanced Placement Language and Composition Curriculum.  Students will continue to refine their critical/analytical writing skills, as well as their rhetorical analysis, argument and synthesis skills.  Students have the option of writing the AP exam (additional cost) in May (please note: this exam will not contribute to the final score awarded by the school) or taking the course for challenge purposes.  There is an emphasis on non-fiction in this class. This is an Advanced Placement course and will be as rigorous.  Additional reading, writing and creation are to be expected.  Course materials must be read prior to the start of the course for students to be successful.

English 30-1 Advanced Placement: Literature and Composition

Prerequisite: English 20-1 AP or 20-1 (75%+) and teacher recommendation
Additional fee: Approximately $50 for course materials
Optional fee: $120 for Advanced Placement Exam

English 30-1 Advanced Placement will integrate the Alberta Learning Program of Studies with the Advanced Placement Literature and Composition Curriculum.  The AP English Literature and Composition course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature. Through the close reading of selected texts, students deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style and themes, as well as such smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism and tone.  Students have the option of writing the AP exam (additional cost) in May (please note: this exam will not contribute to the final score awarded by the school) or taking the course for challenge purposes.  This is an Advanced Placement course and will be as rigorous.  Additional reading, writing and creation are to be expected.  Course materials must be read prior to the start of the course for students to be successful. This is also a diploma course where students will write a government exam for 30% of their mark.

For a more detailed breakdown of course descriptions and prerequisites, please follow the link below to our high school handbook.

Click here to access the High School Handbook